Eagle Products 0.7l Kettle review

0.7l Eagle Products Kettle

I’ve seen many of these kettles posted by people in Scandinavia on Instagram and always thought they look great and then a few months later there is one in the hands of the postman.

Kettle being used over open fire.

They are designed and made in Norway by a company called Eagle Products The produce some fantastic outdoor products and have resellers across the globe. In the uk Ray Mear’s Woodlore is a reseller. These kettles come in 3 sizes 0.7l, 1.5k and a massive 4l. A well proven, solid and durabable kettle made from stainless steel. The lower section and base of the kettle is copper coated to ensure an efficient heat distribution and heating process over a stove or flame.

This kettle features two handles for a more secure and stable fixture when cooking over a fire. It can be used suspended above all types of outdoor heat sources, including a stove, bushbox and over a camp fire. The kettle comes in a nylon bag which will prevent the rest of your kit getting black with soot. These kettles can be purchased online from www.woodlore.co.uk

[instagram-feed id=”3030385895″]

Micro Adventures

What is a micro adventure? In short it’s simple it’s a micro adventure, these micro adventures are simple to organise, cost effective, normally local, challenging, builds new skills, confirms friendship and family bonds, new and easy to organise.

In a busy urbanised world it is easy for us to get sucked into that 9-5, tech controlled world where we sit armchair surfing, becoming keyboard warriors, ooze and criticise YouTube videos of people doing just what this blog post is about finding the time to fit in micro expeditions into our busy life. Look at it on the flip side we work say 9-5 that means you have from 6-8 to do something so you are fitting your work hours in to your adventure time. Finish work head to the beach, cook some food, watch the sun go down, sleep on the beach, get up and head to work.

I’ve mentioned before the need to get out and use the outdoors to our benefit our mental health and this is one way to do it. I recently read an article in the magazine ‘bushcraft and survival skills’ written by Dr Catherine Calderwood ( Chief Medical Officer of Scotland) staying there is increasing evidence that outdoor activities and learning outside the classroom increased academic attainment and improves well-being.

Like I said it strengthens family bonds and friendships, give yourself some ME time or just adjust your usual dog walking into something different.

So what is a micro adventure?

It can be almost anything from a paddle down the river with a stop for lunch, fishing, hiking, wild camping, geocaching, primitive fire lighting the list is endless.

There are plenty of books / YouTube channels about micro adventures available so here are a few ideas of what there is to do but the main thing is tailoring what you do to what you can do within these urbanised time / money constraints. You should look at a micro adventure as a espresso short, full of flavour and only half the size of a Americano.

Here’s a few micro adventures.

  • Breakfast outside

Pack up your bag the night before

  • Polska Kiełbasa

One of the best things we do in the summer is cook Polish Sausage over an open fire. This is typical summer micro adventure in Poland, spending the warm summer months sitting around the fire grilling smoked sausage and washing it down with some fantastic polish beers.

These sausages can be brought a your local Polish deli, my favourite and the best ones I think are called Slanska. Lay the sausage and cut just through the skin diagonally then turn the sausage and cut diagonally again to create little squares, flip the sausage do the same on other side then stock them on you stick you have whittled and heat them (as they are hot smoked) so they go crispy. Serve in bed rolls with Sarepska (polish mustard) and pickles.

  • Wildswimming

This is so frowned upon I. The UK but pretty much everywhere else swimming in rivers and lakes is as normal as waking around them. The issue in the UK is knowing where is safe to swim. Regularly in the summer months whilst dog walking or paddling we will all end up in the river. One of my most memorable camping moments was in Sweden whilst heading to the Klarälven we camped one night in the Glaskogen Park. I was woken early morning by the sound of Wolves in the distance. I got up lit a fire and had a early swim whilst waiting for the Coffee

  • Canoeing

This sport is so adaptable to what you can afford, what you want to do and time constraints. If you don’t have space, money and time to make it cost effective then find somewhere locally to where you are where you can hire canoes / kayaks to head out onto the water for a true micro adventure.

Take your lunch with you and stop somewhere and cook a lunch. My two love to use the Kelly Kettle to cook some noodles on the river bank

  • Fire lighting

Simple day out try different methods of lighting fires. From a bow drill to magnifying glass. Get the family involved, have a competition in who can do it the quickest.

  • Geocaching

This is a great game to play with the kids they love finding the little caches especially when they are full of trinkets. Download the app on your smartphone and search your local area for geocaches head out for the day and use your phone to locate the caches. Some can be tricky and you might need to work out some clues to find where they are hidden.

  • Sleeping on the beach

This is a great one to do any day of the week. I usually pick my two up from school and head straight to the beach for a swim, get the Kelly Kettle out, make some tea and pitch a tent for the evening. There’s always some dry driftwood about for a fire in the evening.

  • Shelter building

There’s not much needed for this a load of trees, some brush for thatching and a good bit of time. Take some food, open fires I’d keep away from but take a cooler and cook something simple. Our Kelly Kettle gets used a lot for these little adventures. Search online for some plans on different types of shelters.

  • Hammock camping

This is now my most favourite method of camping. It is so versatile and it is so comfy and I sleep so well. You don’t need to spend a fortune on hammock camping kit to start of. Have a look online for a cheap hammock and have a look at my post on hammock camping.

DD Hammocks do some really good priced kit worth having a look at them.

  • Winter camping

As long as you’ve got the right gear it doesn’t really matter what the weather is and personally I love camping in the winter. You do really need the right gear because there’s nothing worse than being cold or wet this time of the year. A pleasant evening camping in the winter can become a very miserable night very quickly without the correct gear.

Good clothes, warm clothes a spare change of clothes, 4 season sleeping system and a waterproof shelter is a must. Even if you are setting up for a day outside it is a great feeling building a shelter, cooking food and watching the world go by your shelter.

  • Sunday roast outside

There’s nothing like cooking outdoors and a Sunday roast is a great way to get out and enjoy eating outdoors. Even if the weather is poor, erect a shelter and get the fire going and throw a joint of meat in a ditch oven and let it slowly cook.

Lamb is one of my favourites to cook. Cut 2 onions in half and rest the joint on the onions, out the lid on and place some coals on the lid to evenly roast the meat. Add vegetables after about 45 minutes and let them slowly cook be careful not to cook it to quick or hot from the bottom.

  • Dog walking

This is one of my regular trips out. Dogs need walking everyday and when I have time I’ll take my pre packed day bag and head out along the river or in the forest and spend some time to sit and reflect, brew a coffee and sometime take my breakfast with me.

  • Whittling

There’s something very therapeutic about whittling a piece of green wood into something or even nothing. You don’t need expensive tools. The two knives I carry cost about £25.

There’s loads of videos on YouTube or grab a book and see what you can make. Take your brew kit and sit and have ago with a coffee under the trees.

  • Wild camping

There’s not many place in the UK where this isn’ frowned upon. If your lucky you will know some places where you can get away with wild camping: beaches and riverbanks are a good first option. The main rule is setup late, leave early and leave no trace.

Breakfast flatbread

Breakfast flatbread: Quick little recipe this is a variation to Bannock.

Bannock has been cooked over flames for many generations and still today.  Breakfast Flatbreads are easy to make and really filling.

The original bannocks were heavy, flat cakes of unleavened barley or oatmeal dough formed into a round or oval shape, then cooked on a griddle (or girdle in Scots). In Scotland, before the 19th century, bannocks were cooked on a bannock stane (Scots for stone), a large, flat, rounded piece of sandstone, placed directly onto a fire, used as a cooking surface.  Most modern bannocks are made with baking powder or baking soda as a leavening agent, giving them a light and airy texture.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup of self raising flour and a pinch of salt.
  • 2 rashers of bacon
  • Beef dripping or oil.

Add salt to flour I do this previously to heading out, scrape about a spoonful of dripping into mix.

Pour in a little water and knead in the bag.

Remove from bag and flatten out in hands and place rashers of bacon on the middle and fold edges over to envelope the bacon.

Place in hot pan or skillet and cook on a medium heat until well done.

Medical Kit

I was reading a thread the other day on bushcraft Facebook page concerning what people carry in there medical / first aid kits. So it had me thinking do I carry to much or not enough.

The bizzare things I read people carry led me to think should you med kit depend on what you’re doing / going? Well yes I do think that the amount and contents should vary depending on what you are doing.

Someone had posted their message kit was in a large box weighing 5kg and included Israeli dressings, adrenaline, suture kit, full resus equipment and other items. Yes I’m a deep believer in ‘if you haven’t got it’ ‘you can’t use it’ but realistically look at the chance that you would need all of this. If you are camping out of a car then yes consider a larger kit.

Personally I have a small waterproof medical kit that is used in my day bag, a larger kit which is stocked for a longer duration and another pack that is used is I am a good distance from civilisation.

The other thing to think of is if the brown stuff hits the fan. How do you contact emergency service? We are lucky in the uk as mobile phone coverage is pretty good but if there is no signal how do you gain assistance?

The device I used whilst walking the Fjallraven Classic in Sweden was a SPOT tracker, this is a subscription device that locates you using gps and in emergency you can press a button and it will send a pre-determined message to emergency services in your area. The other great services it offers is you can press another button that will send an ‘OK’ message to predetermined email addresses and mobile numbers giving a link to your location to be viewed online. Also it can connect to your social media sharing your location.

But the question is what to take? So here’s a low down on what I carry in my hiking bag for a multiple day excursion.Extended duration medical kit

From left to right

  • Emergency blanket
  • Gauze
  • Impregnated gauze
  • Betadine
  • Bandage
  • Sack on

Bottom row

  • Wound glue
  • Scissors
  • Needle and thread (used for treating blisters)
  • Paracetamol and Ibuprofen
  • Smecta (diarrhoea treatment)
  • Stern strips
  • Plasters

Day kit

This is in a waterproof box and is taken on trips on water, hiking and fishing. It is relatively small but has enough for basics.

As we any piece of kit it is a good idea to have items that are use for instance if you replaced the betadine with potassium permanganate you would have something to clean wounds, sterilise water to make it drinkable and if mixed with glycerol is a great emergency fire starter.

Items in box

  • Plasters
  • Betadine
  • Surgical tape
  • Bandage
  • Steristrips

Obviously each kit should be tailored to your personal medical needs ie allergic reactions and regular medication should always be carried in a waterproof container. Also emergency contacts and medical he is handy to have kept on person or in medical box.

There really is no need to carry a personal A&E with you unless you are really that accident prone, if you are that bad then you need to consider if you have suitable enough experience to be out by yourself or a distance away from emergency help.

Everything you carry is designed really for self help.

Sami Coffee / Tinder Bag

Sami style coffee bagI’ve been wanting to put one of these bags together for a while. The bags the Sami make are made from reindeer leather but as it’s not easy to get hold of in the uk so much I’ve used a 1.5mm veg tanned leather.

The actual use of the bag has many uses but I wanted 2 bags one for ground coffee and one for tinder.

I made the template out of cardboard and used the circumference of a cd and then just extended the neck, what I have done for future bags is extended the length of the neck from the original design as it was a little too short.

I cut out the back and front and measured the middle section and cut that out.

The weaved tin thread was purchased direct from Sweden it is a typical thread used in Sami craft (duodji).

First thing the thread is platted together and then using glue fixed to a piece of leather the same length as the area it will cover on the face of the bag.

Using thin nylon thread the weave is stitched to the leather then that piece of leather is glued to the front of the bag and then stitched.

Using a stitch marking wheel the stitch is marked out and the side panel is stitched onto the front (with bag inside out) using artificial sinew.

The securing leather is stitched onto the back panel then this is then stitched onto the side and front panel as before.

First attemptThe bag is then turned the correct way and there you have it your own coffee/tinder bag.

My first attempt used a black spun copper thread and black thread. I wasn’t to happy with the stitching so changed the way it was stitched. Also this bag has a carved piece of antler as a clasp for the retaining straps