Covehithe the road to nowhere

road to nowhere
Covehithe the road to nowhere
Looking North

I regularly visit Covehithe the road to nowhere and today was a visit back to this windswept part of the Suffolk coastline.

The plan was to walk along the cliff down to Benacre Broad and south a little way to the area I normally setup and have breakfast.

Beautiful morning, clear skies, sun shinning and hardly any wind.

Walking along the ‘road to nowhere’ where nature has taken over the road that used to supply the village before it was lost to sea I notice that that Hawthorns are heavily laden with berries

(a sign of a harsh winter to come so the wifes tale says).

On the way in I stopped at a Sweet Chestnut tree that was also heavily laden but the nuts hadn’t developed into anything (perhaps due to the extreme heat / lack of rain this summer).

The view North.

As I reach the cliff and look North there is a little Northerly ground swell pushing some waves onto the beach.

Looking at the beach the pebbles have all been replaced by golden sand all the way to the cliff.  This shows that a large northerly ground swell has recently being hitting the coast.

Heading North I can see where the trees that lined the cliff have been removed by Natural England as a project to correct the Suffolk Coastal Path along the cliff and down to Southwold.

Currently the path has to meander from the coast at Benacre Broad, missing Covehithe and along the road to get to Southwold.

On reaching the beach at Benacre from Covehithe the road to nowhere I take some time filming this micro adventure.

Heading South to the area where the trees are in the sand to build a fire and have some coffee and breakfast.

breakfast on the beachBreakfast on the beach.

I was having a cook up with a friend here once when another dog walker said “what a great idea and what a lovely place to sit and have breakfast!”

And it is, you can’t beat cooking outside especially in a spot like this, no crowds, sound of the sea, beautiful day and a good hearty breakfast.

Utilising the trees that are on the beach I gather some fire wood, sweep out a hole for the fire (this also helps as a wind break, the sand is swept, building into a mound which blocks the wind).

Eagle Products 70cl KettleBreakfast

Using a foldable metal grill the Kettle goes on, the kettle I use is Norwegian made by a company call Eagle Products they can be brought in the U.K.

Out comes the frying pan, bacon, mushrooms and the egg sits waiting to be cracked when the bacon is done.

covehitheI like to brew as I call it Cowboy Coffee which is literally just Coffee grounds straight into the kettle once its boiled, leave a few minutes to brew and settle then carefully pour.

Whilst all of this is cooking the Dog sits there knowing she gets her bit of bacon and the frying pans pre-wash is done by the dog before cleaning out using the sand.

Once cleared away its time for the Dog to have her swim and head back home.

 

 

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Covehithe Suffolk’s untouched coastline.

Suffolk’s untouched coastline, Covehithe.

Suffolk’s untouched coastline Covehithe.  Many of my pictures on Instagram are taken at this spot so I thought I’d introduce you to the area.

I spend a lot of time here, I was training for the Fjallraven Classic along this route from Kessingland to Dunwich.

Covehithe beach looking North towards Benacre.

The area is called Covehithe which is located between Kessingland and Southwold.

I have always had a fascination with this part of the Suffolk coastline it’s the ruggedness and wild wind swept cliffs that I find appealing. It’s also down to the fact that this area of the UK is so full of candy floss and static caravans that when you find an area that is completely wild it sticks out.

Pill Box which was placed along the coast as defence during the 2nd world war now fell to the sea.

I spent a lot of my childhood exploring and fishing on this beach and can remember the road to the cliff being much longer. Coastal erosion is a massive issue here where up to 4.5m of cliff is lost to the sea every year.

So saying that since I’ve been visiting around 130 metres have gone into the sea.

In the Doomsday survey the hamlet was known as Nordhalla and was recorded with 13 settlers. It takes its modern name from the de Cove family who held land there during the Middle Ages and hithe from old English meaning quay for loading small vessels. Like it’s nearby neighbour Dunwich it had fallen to the wrath of the North Sea and started to be devoured by coastal erosion and the town declined.

The Church of St Andrew

The church of St Andrew fell into ruin and locals where using its walls as building materials.

Currently a small Church is within the Church ruins.

What I love about this coastline is it is always changing unveiling things hidden from time for a few years or for along time.

 

Regularly wrecks are uncovered for a while and then covered back up, foundations from houses appear out of the cliff then end up on the beach to be covered up later on. It’s a wild coastline we don’t have that much wild coast so this is a haven.

 

 

Speaking to someone from natural England earlier today as they where clearing trees on the headland the plan is to develop a path way from Benacre to extend the Suffolk coastal path to Southwold as at present it meanders around Covehithe to Southwold.

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